And The Rest Of Me Floats

A bold new play all about ‘the messy business of gender’.



Above: Yasmin Zadeh, 2017.


And The Rest Of Me Floats, a new play by Outbox Theatre, is a bold and exciting show all about gender, sexuality and the intersectionality between the two.


Starring performers from across the trans*, non-binary, lesbian and gay communities, ATROMF examines the ways in which gender is questioned, categorised, and policed - often violently so. 


In their inimitable style, Outbox takes an unflinching look at how gender impacts the queer body by weaving together autobiographical performance, movement, pop songs, stand-up and dress-up in an anarchic celebration of the body. This is a piece of theatre that refuses to conform.


Above: The cast of And the Rest of Me Floats 2017.


“We’ve been working on it for a month,” actress Emily Joh Miller told DIVA after the performance. 


“I heard about it through a Facebook group for trans actors. They put out a call, I met them and we really clicked - and thankfully I got cast.


“We’ve just been working on it in a room for the last four weeks and it was weird to actually get that out in front of an audience because it’s just been something that’s existed in our heads for so long, you know? But people have been so receptive. I mean at the end everyone got up and danced and stuff which is what you want from a show!”


“It sounds corny coming from a performer, but I’m such a fan of Outbox and the work they do. This isn’t the kind of work that you really see often at all. I’m really grateful it exits and even more so that I get to be a part of it.”


Above: Emily Joh Miller 2017.


Professional lesbian actress Yasmin Zadeh, believes theatres like Outbox are crucial for LGBT performers. 
“I’ve worked at Outbox for three years and I think it really opens up roles for actors to share their experiences in a way that doesn’t come along in the industry very often. 


“With this play," Yasmin continues, “it’s so personal. Everyone has been so brave, bringing their own experiences to the show. I am always confused about my gender. I never really knew what it was and, with my sexuality and my dad being a muslim, it’s all quite messy, but this cast has taught me so much - just to be you.


“There’s always trepidation when approaching people that have maybe been through a lot or, are transitioning, or are part of the LGBT community and I think, the show more than anything, has just been this positive thing that says, ‘We’re open. We’re not going to be angry if you're trying to understand’." 


At a time when Stonewall’s latest commissioned survey tells us that almost half of trans pupils in the UK have attempted to take their own lives and hate crime towards the LGBTQ community is on the rise, productions like And the Rest of Me Floats are so very important.


Funny, emotional and raw, this piece of theatre has been made by an extra-fierce company of talented performers that shouldn’t be missed. Catch it while you can.


You can see And The Rest Of Me Floats 12 - 23 September (excluding 17 and 18) at the Rose Lipman Building, London and 13-14 November at the Birmingham Repertory Theatre.



Only reading DIVA online? You're missing out. For more news, reviews and commentary, check out the latest issue. It's pretty badass, if we do say so ourselves. //


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