It's London's turn to put on a Bloody Big Brunch 🍅

It's time to put ending #periodpoverty on the menu


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BLOODY BIG BRUNCH

 

A brunch experience with a difference is coming to London for the first time – one that promises to do good with every Bloody Mary poured.

 

Taking place at The Book Club, Shoreditch on 2 June, the Bloody Big Brunch, will serve-up the classic cocktail all day long - but there’s a catch. It can only be "bought" in exchange for sanitary protection...

 

 

It’s an unusual drinks bill for the all-too-common problem of period poverty - a plight experienced by at least 1 in 10 women in the UK. Although the average spend on tampons and sanitary towels is £4,800 over a lifetime, those in financial difficulty often pay a much higher price.

 

Unable to afford what they need, many are forced to use old clothes, toilet paper and newspapers as alternative solutions – or rely on friends and food banks.

 

In response, organisers of the Bloody Big Brunch created a simple but thought-provoking way for people to come together, talk about periods without embarrassment and help end the problem. All sanitary products received at events are donated to women-in-need throughout the country.

 

To help make donations as easy as possible, the Bloody Big Brunch has partnered with Hey Girls!, an ethical, buy-one-give-one sanitary pad social enterprise who are on a mission to support girls and young women throughout the UK.

 

 

At the brunch, the award-winning Hey Girls! will offer the opportunity to make contactless donations, meaning pads go straight to those who need them most.

 

The event will also feature DJs, story-telling and the opportunity to hear more from period poverty organisations and campaigners.

 

Lee Beattie, one of the organisers of the Bloody Big Brunch, told DIVA: “It’s time to remove the taboo of talking about periods so we can talk about period poverty.

 

“Taxed as a non-essential luxury item, the reality is that sanitary products should be a basic essential available to all women. So we’re using an actual luxury - brunching with a Bloody Mary in hand - to shine a light on this massive issue that lots of people – women and men – don’t know much about.

 

“Nobody should feel shame about menstruation, nor should they have to resort to uncomfortable substitutes or no sanitary products at all. By getting bloody talking over a Bloody Mary, we can start helping those in need – and putting pressure on the government for change.”

 

 

Celia Hodson, founder of Hey Girls! added: “Reports highlighting women living in poverty and women who are homeless being forced to use newspapers and socks during their periods has opened up a wave of donations and drop off stations across the UK in libraries, food-banks and public spaces.

 

“We must now consider how we convert this current goodwill into a sustainable solution for period poverty.

 

“Enterprises like Hey Girls! are already playing a significant role – our buy-one-give-one model allows customers to donate a pack by doing something they already do every month, without any additional cost to them.

 

“Each pack purchased results in a direct donation to a girl or women in need in the UK.“

 

#BloodyBigBrunch​

 

The Bloody Big Brunch London takes place at The Book Club, 100-106 Leonard Street, Shoreditch, from 12-4pm. Everyone welcome!

 

 

Only reading DIVA online? You're missing out. For more news, reviews and commentary, check out the latest issue. It's pretty badass, if we do say so ourselves.

 

divadigital.co.uk // divadirect.co.uk // divasub.co.uk

 

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