Clexacon: Annie Briggs

DIVA gets up close and personal with the stars of this year's Clexacon, THE multi-fandom event for LGBTQ women and allies 🌟


Published:

Annie Briggs. CLAIREvoyant.

 

As the first and largest multi-fandom event for LGBTQ women and allies, ClexaCon brings together thousands of diverse LGBTQ fans and content creators from around the world to celebrate positive representation for LGBTQ women in the media.

 

In this series, DIVA catches up with the stars of this year's Clexacon London convention to find out a little more about them before the BIG event. We can't wait... 🌟

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Annie Briggs (@anniemorganb) on

 

DIVA: What’s your name, and where in the world do you come from?

AR: Annie Morgan Briggs. I was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. 

 

What show do you star in, and which character do you play?

I play Ruby in CLAIREvoyant. 

 

How long have you been playing this character?

One season (so far!) but because I wrote this character, I feel like I've been living with her a lot longer – a few years, really!

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Annie Briggs (@anniemorganb) on

 

Describe your character in three words.

Mercurial, agitated, willful ...and passionate.

 

Describe yourself, IRL, in three words.

Basically – the tits.

 

Who was your TV crush growing up as a kid? 

I mean Dana Scully until I die. No question. But also... Jordan Catalano (My So-Called-Life) 'cause that hair, and Officer Judy Hoffs (21 Jump Street) 'cos of her sick style. They're both solid runners-up. I was a little overwhelmed with crushes as a kid. Basically, I still am!

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Annie Briggs (@anniemorganb) on

 

What’s your favourite thing about taking part in conventions like Clexacon?

As an actor and creator, (especially in the mediums of TV and film) it can feel like I'm throwing material out into the abyss hoping that it'll speak to and resonate with a community or individual.

 

Unlike theatre, where the feedback loop is experienced immediately in the moment, I'm not always privy to the response or affect it has had on an audience. So attending an event where we get to talk to our audiences directly, and receive feedback is pretty incredible.

 

I think human-to-human contact is so important and necessary, and is something which is beginning to dwindle in this wild digital age which we're all trying to navigate...

 

Tell us, in a sentence, why you think magazines like DIVA are still important.

Because publications that spotlight issues and topics that are relevant and of interest to women in the queer communities are still vastly underrepresented. The "still" will sadly remain in that sentence until we begin to see parity in female-focused content.

 

 

Only reading DIVA online? You're missing out. For more news, reviews and commentary, check out the latest issue. It's pretty badass, if we do say so ourselves.

 

divadigital.co.uk // divadirect.co.uk // divasub.co.uk

 

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